Plant-based Ground Beef

Here’s a great alternative to ground beef. Let me introduce you to Beyond Beef. A Plant-based version of real beef. All the ingredients are made from plants. It’s also soy-free and gluten-free. As you can see, it’s Non-GMO Project Verified, which basically means this product was not made with any genetically modified organisms. The ingredients are pure, just as Mother Nature intended them to be.

Take a look at the ingredients below. There are no meat byproducts, soy, or artificial preservatives.

INGREDIENTS:

Water, Pea Protein Isolate*, Expeller-pressed Canola Oil, Refined Coconut Oil, Rice Protein, Natural Flavors, Cocoa Butter, Mung Bean Protein, Methylcellulose, Potato Starch, Apple Extract, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Vinegar, Lemon Juice Concentrate, Sunflower Lecithin, Pomegranate Fruite Powder, Beet Juice Extract (For Color).

All plants ingredients! Where can you buy this and many other plant-based foods? Whole Foods Market! Plus, it’s just in time for the July 4th holiday. Get your grills out and grill up some plant-based burgers or make the family a nice meatless meatball and spaghetti dinner. They won’t know the difference.

Be safe and healthy, and have a Happy 4th of July.

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The Secret to Keeping Black Men Healthy? Maybe Black Doctors – The New York Times

In an intriguing study, black patients were far more likely to agree to certain health tests if they discussed them with a black male doctor.

Black men have the lowest life expectancy of any ethnic group in the United States. Much of the gap is explained by greater rates of chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease, which afflict poor and poorly educated black men in particular.

But why is that? Lack of insurance? Lack of access to health care?

Now, a group of researchers in California has demonstrated that another powerful force may be at work: a lack of black physicians.

— Read on www.nytimes.com/2018/08/20/health/black-men-doctors.html

Let’s Do Lunch

 

Plant-Based Sandwich – OrganicREADY
 
I just created this meatless sandwich from a few items I brought in to work. When most people think of sandwiches, they think of three core components: meat, cheese and bread. Well, here’s a wonderful alternative for a quick whole foods, plant-based (WFPB) sandwich.  I used a thin whole wheat pita bread which has 60 calories per serving, avocado, tomatoes and red bell peppers. 

Next time, I could switch it up and have hummus, lettuce, or even use a slice of cabbage, onions or cucumbers. The options are endless with plant-based sandwiches.  I’ve always been a fan of bringing a meal from home, and sandwiches are just about the perfect lunch food because they’re portable and have an endless variety of options.  According to a national survey, Americans are buying lunch instead of bringing it from home nearly three times per week. 
Enjoy😋

Early Morning Juicing

  
I woke up late this morning, but I refuse to leave the house without my organic carrot juice😋. 

To cut my time down in the mornings, I prepare my carrots from the night before. Plus, I add one green Granny Smith apple. According to the Gerson Therapy, combing these two together is key for detoxing the body of heavy metals.  Granny Smith contains malic acid which is responsible for their distinctive tart taste. Plus, sour apples are higher in potassium, says Katheryn Alexandra who is a Gerson Practitioner. 

Have a wonderful healthy start to your day😋

An Easy Plant-Based Salad

 

Salads are one of the most easiest and most satisfying ways to get your fruits and vegetables in your daily diet.  In this particular salad, I have shredded green leaf lettuce, watercress, yellow bell pepper, one organge, one apple, and a three bean salad with fresh celantro and curly leaf parsley minced and garnished.  For the dressing, I squeeze a half of lemon for a little more zing.   The fresh bean salad adds protein and fiber to whole me longer through my busy day. 

What do you put in your salads? 

Vegan Banana Bread

This vegan banana bread recipe is eggless and dairy free. I used mostly organic products, with the exception to the baking soda and powder. You’ll enjoy this banana bread even more because it’s filled with healthy ingredients, and it’s also delicious.

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Prep time: 20 minutes
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease and flour a loaf pan. I used coconut oil for greasing.

Ingredients:
• 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
• 1 tsp cinnamon
• 1/2 tsp nutmeg
• 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
• 1/4 tsp baking soda
• Pinch of salt
• 1 cup Turbinado sugar
• 1/2 cup coconut oil (or any other)
• 3 ripe bananas
• 1/2 cup of apple sauce
• 1 tsp vanilla
Optional additions
• 1/3 cup wheat germ
• 1 cup raw crushed walnuts
• 1/2 cup raisins
• 1/3 Chia seeds

Instructions
In a large mixing bowl sift together the flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, baking soda, and baking powder. Then, in a separate bowl smash the bananas until the big lumps are out. Mix in the oil, vanilla, applesauce, sugar and salt.

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Now, gently fold in the dry ingredients into the wet making sure everything is mixed in well. At this point you could add any of the optional ingredients. In this recipe I added wheat germ, walnuts and raisins. Pour finished batter in the prepared loaf pan.

Bake for 50 minutes to 1 hour. Banana bread is done when a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean. Cool before slicing.

Serving: 8 Slices

Enjoy!

My Broccoli Seedlings

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Fall is approaching and this is the best time to start growing “Fall Vegetables”. These are vegetables that thrive best in cooler weather.

• Beets
• Broccoli
• Brussels sprouts
• Cabbage
• Carrots
• Collards
• Kale
• Kohlrabi
• Leeks
• Lettuce
• Mustard
• Swiss chard
• Turnips

I’m growing broccoli, carrots, and beets. In the two pots above are my broccoli seedlings. I started these indoors about a month ago, and now they’re ready to be transplanted. I planted the carrots and beets directly in the earth a few weeks ago, and I’ve also planted some carrots in a pot.

In New York, the weather is averaging between 75-82 degrees, and at night low 60’s, which by the way is perfect growing conditions for these plants. According to the broccoli seed package, the soil temperature should be between 75-85 degrees Fahrenheit, and maturation is 60-90 days. This is the best time to get these seedlings into the ground.

I love the Fall vegetables, especially broccoli, and my children love them too. Broccoli is extremely healthy for you. I read an article on Huffington Post titled, Broccoli Eaters Get More Out of Life, just the title alone intrigued me.

Well, researchers in New Zealand have found a link between eating a lot of fruits and vegetables, and linking it to eudaemonic well-being. Of course, I had to further research eudaemonic, which according to the dictionary, means happiness. I’m genuinely a happy person and I eat a fair amount of plant-based foods; nonetheless, I believe this is true. The original study is pretty interesting as well.

I’ll keep everyone updated on my broccoli journey. These just went into the earth this week. I think by early November they’ll be ready for harvesting. If there’s any frosting, I’ll have to cover them up with some agribon cloth. It’ll protect the plants from freezing. Wish me luck!

Growing Garlic is Super Easy

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I decided to grow a small patch of garlic last year, so I planted a bunch of organic garlic seeds in October 2013. I didn’t do much but, cleared a small area in the garden and planted the seeds. I harvested my tiny crop in July and was totally blown away.

At first, I was a little apprehensive about the outcome. I planted them in 2013, and it wasn’t until the middle of July when I uprooted the first one. It was perfect! Then the others were also perfect. My children and I were extremely ecstatic. We all were jumping up and down as if we won the lottery.

Growing garlic is super easy. If I could do it, anyone can. I couldn’t believe these little suckers survived the whole cold and snowy winter. Of course, when the weather finally warmed up, all sorts of weeds were growing all around the garlic plants. It wasn’t until early May when I finally got down and dirty. Weeding is not my favorite task to do in the garden; nonetheless, it had to be done in order for the garlic to get the proper nutrients from the soil. I also added some organic compost, chicken manure, and organic liquid kelp to fertilize the soil.

Here’s a picture I took after I uprooted the weeds.

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I bought the seeds from Filaree Garlic Farm. I searched online for organic seed companies, and I came across Filaree. They seemed like the perfect choice at the time. Well, based on the name alone, it sounded great. After some further research, Filaree Farm had over 25 years in the business, and their main business is organic garlic farming. They also plant and sell potatoes and shallots. I contacted Filaree about some literature on growing garlic, and they were extremely friendly and helpful.

The garlic variety I planted are called Hardnecks Porcelain and Rocambole. I chose Rocambole because they have large easy to peel cloves, and Porcelain because they have the highest allicin content of the garlic varieties. Garlics are super healthy. According to whfoods.com, garlic encompasses amazing cardiovascular health benefits, anti-inflammatory benefits, antibacterial and antiviral benefits, and cancer prevention.

Check these out! Not bad for my first time…

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I’m already excited about planting again this coming Fall.

EAT A VEGAN MEAL

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Each year, the average American consumes 175 pounds of meat and poultry, almost double the global average. Eating less red meat may do you a favor: It can lower your risk of cancer and heart disease. “Learn to love big heaps of vegetables,” says Mark Bittman New York Times food columnist and author of VB6.

To achieve that feeling, Bittman says to try meatless proteins, such as lentils, edamame, garbanzo beans and tofu. He also recommends roasting six sweet potatoes. “The more you cook and have stuff around, the less you’ll depend on junk.”

He’s right! Once you prepare your meals ahead of time, the less likely you will make bad food choices. I think salads are super easy. Every weekend I spend over $70 dollars on organic vegetables and fruits. Apples alone I spend about $10 dollars. Between me and my three children, we go through apples quickly. Salads are great for lunch and dinner. They’re easy to make and can be very filling. Just pile on the fruits and vegetables and don’t forget your plant-based protein. You can’t go wrong!

Here’s one of my favorite recipes with garbanzo beans:

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Ingredients:
1 bunch of kale
1 Tbsp of olive oil
3 chopped garlics
1 chopped onion
1 cup chopped cranberries
2 cups garbanzo beans
1 red bell pepper
1/2 cup sliced almonds

Directions:
Heat olive oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add chopped onions, garlic and red peppers. Cook until onions are slightly translucent. Add kale, garbanzo beans and cranberries then, sauté for 5 minutes. Season to taste with salt and peppers. Toss in almonds.

Yield 4 servings

The idea here is to eat more plants, especially leaves. Plants are a great source of vital nutrients, enzymes, antioxidants, and minerals. And eat as many different kinds of plants as possible. They all have different antioxidants and so help the body eliminate different kinds of toxins.

Sources:
January 2014 issue of O, The Oprah Magazine
Kale food facts: High Vitamin K and Anti-Cancer properties
Plant-Based Research

Fruit Fact: Lemon

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Lemon water has an alkalizing effect in the body. Even if you drink it just before any meal, it will help your body maintain a higher pH than if you didn’t drink it.

The higher or more alkaline your pH, the more your inner terrain is resistant to minor and major diseases.

Lemons contain ascorbic acid (vitamin C), which demonstrates anti-inflammatory effects, and is used as complementary support for asthma and other respiratory symptoms. Plus, it enhances iron absorption in the body; iron plays an important role in immune function. Lemon also contains citric acid, flavonoids, B-complex vitamins, calcium, copper, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and fiber.

I’m an avid lemon water drinker. It’s my morning, afternoon and night time go-to beverage. The best part is the vital nutrients this simple drink encompasses. I wouldn’t trade it for anything else.

Other great reads:
Ten Reason Why you Should Drink Lemon Water